Lessons about Judas’ Salvation

God Speaks Regarding the Salvation of Judas Iscariot:

Click Here: http://trumpetcallofgodonline.com/index.php5?title=From_Betrayal_to_Victory

 

 

Judas.
A man.
A scoundrel.

Oh how I love Judas. … or at least my flesh LOVES to think that some people are so evil, that I can judge myself better than them by comparison. Thinking the flattering notion that I am savable, but they are not.

I recently noticed something that challenged my viewpoint about Judas. It is a relief to put to rest the superiority about which my flesh was weighing me down, because the Gospels points to the conclusion that Judas was a sheep.

Before Jesus was betrayed, He prayed this:

Joh 17:12
“While I was with them, I was keeping them in Your name which You have given Me; and I guarded them and not one of them perished but the son of perdition, so that the Scripture would be fulfilled.

Two main points.

  1. Judas was the son of perdition (which implies destruction).
  2. Judas was given to the Lord Jesus by the Father to keep, along with the others.

It is crucial to my point to keep in mind that the Father gave Judas to the Lord to save, because of the next quote from the Lord:

Joh 6:39
“This is the will of Him who sent Me, that of all that He has given Me I lose nothing, but raise it up on the last day.

John 10:27-29
“My sheep hear My voice, and I know them, and they follow Me;
and I give eternal life to them, and they will never perish; and no one will snatch them out of My hand.
“My Father, who has given them to Me, is greater than all; and no one is able to snatch them out of the Father’s hand.

This leaves us with only two possibilities.

  1. That Judas was eventually given grace to come to the Lord and be His sheep, for it is clear that the Father gave Judas to the Lord for this reason.
  2. Or Jesus lied when He said that He would not loose a single sheep given to Him by the Father.

Of course there is evidence that Judas did indeed come to full repentance by God’s grace after his betrayal of the Lord.

Matthew 27:3-4
Judas, the one who betrayed him, realized that Jesus was doomed. Overcome with remorse, he gave back the thirty silver coins to the high priests,
saying, “I’ve sinned. I’ve betrayed an innocent man.” They said, “What do we care? That’s your problem!”

Here are the lessons that I glean from all of this:

  • All of us that claim to be saved, should also be aware that at one time we, too, were sons of perdition.
  • We all need grace, revelation and the call of our Shepherd to respond and show remorse for our sins and to come to Him in all humility.
  • Jesus can save even those that seem to be the least likely of it.
  • It does no good to see people as they are at this moment or to evaluate them by what they have already done. Instead, we should evaluate everyone by the potential that God can make of them, even to see that potential as already fulfilled, because it is a cake-walk for God to bring out their full potential.
  • Stay humble. Do not let yourself be flattered with the notion that you picked up on the Gospel, but that others just aren’t bright enough to have picked up upon it. Rather, recognize with thanksgiving for all of God’s provision and grace, knowing that we never merit it. It was God’s choosing, not our own that landed us with this gift of new birth.
  • Keep hope, but not in yourself. If you are concerned for someone’s eternal destiny, all you need to know is TRUST. Trust that God loves them and will bring them along according to the will of the Father, and according to His timing. What good has worry ever done for us about such things? Trust and obey is all we need.

Well, I’m sure there are other lessons. These are the ones that come to mind first of all for me. Perhaps, a thought has come into your mind as you read this. If so, please share a comment below.

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About TrumpetCallofGod

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Posted on July 18, 2013, in 7. Other. Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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